Tag Archives: Caribbean Entrepreneur

Caribbean Entrepreneurs Social Media Social Network

The Perfect Social Media Strategy For Caribbean Businesses

Caribbean Social Media Strategy

A few months after moving to Toronto, I went to a networking event for entrepreneurs. I met some fantastic people, some of whom I am still in contact with today. I remember speaking to a business coach at that event; we talked about my business aspirations. I told her I wanted to work with Caribbean entrepreneurs; I felt a need to help them, I felt the Caribbean was getting left behind where Social Media was concerned. The advice I got was, don’t do it, Caribbean entrepreneurs are not a good market if you want to make money. Fast forward a few years, I didn’t listen, I still decided to work with Caribbean entrepreneurs and business and even though the advice wasn’t bad advice. I am Grenadian, and home is where the heart is.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs How They Did It-Series Storytelling

How Award Winning Dominican Entrepreneur Oudin Samuel Build A Thriving Website Management Platform

Today on #HowTheyDidIt I talk to the award-winning Dominican entrepreneur Oudin Samuel. Oudin built a successful website management platform across the Caribbean region and North America. He has also won two regional awards one of them being the OECS 30 Under 30 Award. Read more about Oudin story.

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Business Start-Up Entrepreneurship Social Media

5 Things Entrepreneurs DO NOT Need to Start a Business (Number 4 Can Be Rather Controversial)

Caribbean social media

There are many articles and blog posts out there that take a look into some of the things that every entrepreneur needs to do. While different people have different views as to what entrepreneurs need based on their experiences and expertise, I believe, however, it is important to note some of the things that entrepreneurs do not need when starting a business.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs Featured How They Did It-Series Storytelling

How Jamaican David Martin Became an Animation Evangelist

Today on “How They Did It” I speak to David Martin, the Jamaican born Animation Evangelist currently leading the charge where digital animation in the Caribbean is concerned.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs Entrepreneurial Stories How They Did It-Series

How Bajan Entrepreneur Monique Mayers Built A Thriving Consultancy That Transcends Borders

Monique welch

Today on “How They Did It” I feature the Idea Alchemist herself, Mrs. Monique Mayers. Monique is an entrepreneur extraordinaire from Barbados, based currently in Toronto. Today we talk about the journey she went through to become who she is today.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs Entrepreneurial Stories How They Did It-Series

How Tech Entrepreneur Cenus Hinds Built Technology Company in St Vincent and the Grenadines

Konservi

Today on “How They Did It” I feature Cenus Hinds, a 22-year-old tech entrepreneur from St Vincent and the Grenadines. Cenus is the creative genius behind Konservi, a technology company in the Caribbean responsible for Tapp – a mobile application that shows deals, promotions, and events and allows you to purchase these using credit/debit card payments. This is Cenus story.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs How They Did It-Series Storytelling

How Heidi St. Clair Built An Award Winning Child Care Business in St Lucia

St Clair sitting service

Today on “How they did it” I talk to Heidi St.Clair, the OECS 30 under 30 award-winning entrepreneur and owner of St. Clair Sitting Service in St Lucia. Heidi talks about how she switched from wanting to be a fashion designer to launching her own business based on her love for working with children.

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Business Start-Up Entrepreneurship

It’s practical to make money doing what you love

If you have passion for what you’re doing you’ll be willing to put in the extra hours. This one from Gary Vaynerchuk himself. Watch the video and share your thoughts.

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Caribbean Entrepreneurs Facebook Social Media

5 Reasons Why Buying Facebook Likes Is a Waste of Time and Money for Your Business

I recently had a client who I was consulting and one of the things he was working on was setting up his Facebook page and generating traffic. He decided that in order to generate some likes for his new Facebook page, he would purchase a couple thousand likes for his page. I have never been a fan of buying likes or any kind of audience on social media for that matter, but I was interested to see what would happen.

After the order for likes was made, I decided to check out the page and look at the persons who liked, and when the likes were coming in steady. I started noticing something weird. The persons who were liking his page: 1- Were not the target market of his business, 2- These persons all had different profile pictures but the exact same post, 3- maximum number of post on the page was three. Basically the profiles were all fake and to me that was a complete waste of time. Why would anyone want likes from fake profiles? My client immediately stopped, but here are 5 reasons buying likes is a waste of time.

1. Poor or No engagement: If the majority of fans are fake, then when you publish your best content you will hardly be reaching anyone. When offers are published in your business, it will be a waste of time and there will be no true engagement and no one to reach.

2. It will mess up your EDGERANK: Your EDGERANK score is based on the amount of visits to your page, your comments, likes on contents and how much time it is shared. If you purchased fans and the people on your page are fake and not interacting with your brand then your EDGERANK score will be very low, and Facebook will see your page as unimportant.

3. You may lose future prospective real fans: If someone stumbles upon your page and realize that no one is talking about this or there is absolutely no interaction, they may perceive that what you’re doing is unimportant and just move away without becoming a fan.

4. It’s a waste of money: Normally in business whenever you purchase something, it should be something of value. In the case of buying fans, there is no value there, you are basically buying something or someone that doesn’t exist that will add absolutely no value to your brand.

5. Unable to generate leads and sales: True Facebook marketers use Facebook as a means of generating leads and then sales. So unless you are purchasing adds which can reach real people, then marketing to your “purchased” fan base and trying to get them off Facebook and unto your website, landing or sales pages will be futile since that may not be real.

There are alternatives to purchasing fake fans or fake likes; one can ask friends on their personal page to like their page and invite their friends to like it. They can put their Facebook page in their email signature, create valuable contents that will attract people and promote them, and place their fan page in the persona description on their personal page. One can also simply purchase adds which can generate likes, leads and sales. There is no shortcut to marketing in general, the same goes for Facebook marketing. Take your time and grow your fan base, there are amazing programs and people that can teach you how to do so such as Amy Porterfield and Brian Moran. Just stop wasting your company’s time and money.

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Facebook Social Media

How Grenadian and Caribbean Soca Artists can use Facebook and Instagram to build their Brands

When I younger, I wanted to become a soca artist. I even started writing songs with my friends, but I quickly realized I didn’t have what it took, so I decided to focus on what I was good at. In the past, soca artists advertised themselves to the public with the help of radio stations, DJs, and promoters, who booked them for shows. Therefore, artists didn’t have much control over their brands; however, because of technological advancements, the script has been flipped. Today’s technology now gives artists a significant say regarding the distribution and exposure of their musical products. Social media platforms like Facebook and Instagram practically give soca artists, regardless their stature in the industry, a somewhat even playing field. Artists now have the power to control and build their brands while bypassing the “badmind” DJs who often times intentionally neglect to share their music. Consequently, social media platforms are now making it easier for thriving musicians.

Uploading Music Natively vs. Sharing YouTube Links

Facebook is now big on video sharing as evidenced by their push with video ads, 360 videos, and Facebook live. Sometimes, when artists share their music on Facebook, they first upload it via YouTube then share the YouTube link to Facebook. Going forward, however, consider uploading your videos natively to Facebook instead. Facebook is in direct competition with YouTube and unfortunately for soca artists, Facebook’s algorithms punish videos shared with YouTube links. Therefore, you will be rewarded with more reach and views if you upload your videos directly to Facebook. Mind you, you should upload your music to YouTube as well, but just be aware that if you want more reach on Facebook, don’t share the YouTube link.

Share Short Clips on Instagram

Before, videos on Instagram could have only been 15 seconds long. Today, however, you can upload 60 seconds videos. Therefore, don’t be afraid to share a one-minute clip from your video to pique listeners’ interest.

Video Ads

As previously mentioned, video ads are now a major part of Facebook’s product. So do you know that by spending $5US or less it is possible to get thousands of video views on Facebook? Obviously, you would need to know how to setup and run a Facebook video ad, but hey, it’s not difficult. You can visit YouTube for tutorials or contact me, and I will show you how. At the moment, one of my clients is a jazz artist, and we have been using video ads to promote her music and concerts, and the results have been phenomenal. Consequently, I advise soca artists to start taking advantage of this opportunity as well. Instagram ads are now becoming a big deal too, so you should definitely give it a shot also. Just imagine it’s the carnival season, and you are a new artist with a “wicked tune”. However, only the established names are getting radio time. Instead of accepting the status quo, here is a simple solution. You could circumvent the system by spending just $5US to promote your music even if you don’t have an actual music video, which isn’t totally necessary. Many persons, including myself, often listen to music on YouTube or Facebook with just a still picture. Therefore, with such a small but effective investment, you have little reason to sit and wait for radio play when you have the tools to get your music out to a much wider audience than the radio can offer.

Consistency and Building a Community

Shows like Power or Game of Thrones are successful in part because they don’t ignore social media. Even after each season’s finale, they are still active on Facebook and Instagram reminding you of the just concluded episodes and in preparation for the new. With that said, soca artists should pattern their social media habits after those successful franchises instead of using a cyclical approach. From observation, many artists are very active on social media during the carnival season; however, after the festivities are over, they make a huge mistake by going silent. Therefore, they should consider year-round promotions on social media to garner as many supporters, sales, and job opportunities as possible. Also, many soca artists mismanage Facebook and Instagram. Instead of using the platforms as a vital business tool and as a means of building a community around their music, they unfortunately, use them to spread their unfounded information, divisive topics and display unsavory conduct, which may alienate supporters and potential patrons. Consequently, artists should refrain from the negatives and strive to build a community around their music. And if they need help building, their music community, it is advised that they speak to a Facebook or Instagram strategist.

Facebook Live

In keeping with the use of videos, I have realized that some Grenadian promoters now use live streams to increase their business ventures’ reach. Further, as soca artists, you can also live stream your performances through platforms like Facebook Live. Obviously, the actual streaming would have to be done by someone else like a member of your management team or friend of course, but you should consider live streaming your performances, the process of making your music, or practically anything you think will interest your fans to build brand equity. Right now Facebook’s algorithms are very favorable towards live videos so don’t pass up on this opportunity.

Provide Value

Pardon my tone but please stop posting nonsense on social media. Remember that most patrons tie your contributions to your products. Therefore, if you are deemed to be a constant poster of valueless material, it is possible you would tune out your intended audience when it matters. Therefore, please ensure that your posts are entertaining, educational, positive, or provide some kind of significance to your fans. Like I stated above, be consistent while providing value.

Admittedly, many more strategies for brand building can be done; however, these are some of the basic approaches that every Grenadian soca artist and those throughout the Caribbean should take if they intend to make a mark in a potentially lucrative business. At #IamGrenadian, we have shared the stories of many Grenadian soca artists, and as a digital marketing strategist, I felt it was my obligation to write this article to hopefully help others. Also, these methods go beyond soca music; they can be effective for any genre. Therefore, since you now have the power to build your brand using these platforms, just ensure that you use them properly or seek the services of a social media strategist if necessary. Also, for those who may object to getting help because you have a Facebook page and Instagram profile consider this. Having a car doesn’t make you a mechanic, so having access to the necessary social media platforms doesn’t make you a Facebook or Instagram marketer. Consequently, if you are trained in social media marketing, perfect, if not, then get up to speed or work with someone.

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